Picked and Planted June 24th – July 5th

This week (plus a bit) we picked:

Over 2 and a half pounds of Haskap Berries – a few were still on the tart side – we couldn’t wait! Plus many, many samples – I don’t think my wee girl is going to let us pick any decent amount to bake with this year (although I did manage to get a batch of haskap lemon drop scones and a haskap shortcake made!) These sell for a minimum of $15.00 per pound – they win the prize for most lucrative pick of the week.

Strawberries – so delicious!! I am more than dreaming of shortcake…we have been getting our fill! Unfortunately, so have the squirrels…

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Sugar Sprint Snap peas and Oregon Giant Snow peas are here – so delicious right off the vine.

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Chocolate, berry and mojito mints, lemon balm and lavender have been supplying me and my two busy bees with herbal teas and a good reason to sit still and enjoy a few minutes on the patio watching the birds.

 

We continue to pick all the greens, turnips, radishes and herbs from last week that our bellies could hold!!

Approx savings compared to local market: $103.18!!!

Total weight picked this week: 10.81 pounds

This week we planted:

Succession planting of Mouse Melons aka cucamelons – it was too wet and they did not germinate…

Marketmore 76 and Burpless string cucumbers – second planting

Watermelon seedlings – unsure of type – they called to us at the market!

Royal Burgundy beans, second planting

Beets – Chioggia, Taunus, Early Wonder and Detroit Red Supreme, second planting

Napoli and Sweetness II Carrots, second planting

Laurentian Turnip (winter storage variety of Rutabaga)

Cherry Belle radish, second planting – it has been so cold and wet that they do alright!

Sugar Sprint peas, second planting

Genovese Basil and Cilantro around the peppers and tomatoes

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Maybe some tomatoes in our future?!

“One cannot think, love, sleep well if one has not dined well.” ~ Virginia Wolf

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13 thoughts on “Picked and Planted June 24th – July 5th

    • No, they are native to Japan and Siberia, I believe! The University of Saskatchewan have been breeding them for North America and there are a few farms trying to bring them to the East Coast of Canada because they are very hardy. They ripen before any other berry in our area and taste something like a tart blueberry crossed with a raspberry. We bought them as an experimental edible hedge and it has worked out so very well!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ha! Succession planting happens at our house when slugs or sogginess provide the opportunity! It also helps that the early spring beds are all bolting now and freeing up space now that it is finally getting hot 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

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